Yates Family Law, P.C.
Speak with one of our attorneys today.
going separate ways?
Changes Lead To Choices Your Expert Guides Through Changing Times
Yates Family Law, P.C.
Speak with one of our attorneys today.
going separate ways?
Changes Lead To ChoicesYour Expert Guides Through Changing Times
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Will nesting work for your family?

On Behalf of | Apr 22, 2022 | Child Custody, Divorce, Family Law Issues |

As parents, you want what is best for your child. Doing something that hurts your child will also hurt you, but sometimes, there is no way around these things.

Divorce situations are one of those times. However, there are things you can do to make the aftermath easier for your child.

How does nesting work?

Divorce Mag takes a look at bird nesting, an option for divorcing parents. This is a form of housing during and after divorce that puts your child’s needs and comfort first and foremost.

Nesting takes its name from the way birds interact with their young. The young stay in the nest until they can fly on their own, with the parents visiting the nest to bring food and other essentials. Similarly, nesting allows your child to remain in the family home instead of going between your and your co-parent’s houses in accordance with a visitation schedule.

You and your co-parent will take turns staying in the family home with your child, instead. This allows your child to focus solely on adjusting to life after the divorce. They do not have to worry about adjusting to life in a new city or concern themselves with making new friends. They also do not have to worry about a new home environment or the possibility of missing out on something fun because they are with the other parent.

What you and your co-parent must have

This does require extra work from you and your co-parent. For example, you need the ability to afford or otherwise obtain two separate forms of housing, as you cannot stay at the family home 24/7 any longer. But if you can make it work, this option can serve a major benefit to your child.