Yates Family Law PC
Speak with Michael A. Yates today.
going separate ways?
Changes Lead To Choices Your Expert Guide Through Changing Times
Yates Family Law PC
Speak with Michael A. Yates today.
going separate ways?
Changes Lead To ChoicesYour Expert Guide Through Changing Times
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Do Oregon parents pay child support for adult children in school?

On Behalf of | Apr 29, 2023 | Child Support |

When your Oregon relationship or marriage ends, you may have to work through issues involving child custody and child support. Depending on the age of your child and whether he or she plans to go to college, you and your ex may also need to figure out how you are going to pay for him or her to attend school.

Per the Oregon Judicial Department, Oregon is among a handful of states that upholds child support arrangements in select circumstances after a child turns 18.

When child support for an adult child is necessary

The court may order the parent who currently pays child support to continue to do so for an 18-, 19- or 20-year-old adult child attending school provided certain conditions hold true. For instance, your adult child must not have married by this time. Furthermore, your child must be performing relatively well in school, per the school’s own administration. Finally, your adult child must have a course load that is, at minimum, one-half of the course load seen by a full-time student.

How much support a parent must pay

Child support for an adult child in school differs from child support paid for a minor child because it does not need to cover all of the adult child’s expenses. Instead, it seeks to supplement the income or resources an adult child may already have. Factors that help determine the amount a paying parent must pay for an adult child include the income of both parties and whether the parents have other children to support, among others.

If you and your family are unable to agree on an amount of support for an adult child, the state may have to step in and decide for you.